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Scaling Your Sales Strategy
Content Strategy

Scaling Your Sales Strategy

Scaling a sales strategy is hard. There’s no pre-approved messaging, documented call scripts, and often there’s a need for a host of different platforms and CRMs. On top of having to produce countless prospect-facing materials, sales need to be closed to stay afloat and attract investors. Unfortunately, there’s no secret sauce and templates can’t do the hard work for you.

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Wade McNamara
April 1, 2022

Scaling a sales strategy is hard. There’s no pre-approved messaging, documented call scripts, and often there’s a need for a host of different platforms and CRMs. On top of having to produce countless prospect-facing materials, sales need to be closed to stay afloat and attract investors. Unfortunately, there’s no secret sauce and templates can’t do the hard work for you.

Here are a few tips Pixoul used for when you’re first starting out:

1. Know Your Prospect

The most important aspect of any sales strategy is knowing, and actively learning about your prospect. Adapting to common terms and communicating your product is the foundation of any sales playbook. An easy way to figure out what your prospect cares about is to shift from pitching your product, to understanding your prospect’s current situation. During your first few campaigns, pick up on constant themes, complaints, objections, and competitive intel. Utilize what you learn to shape your next approach. Knowing what your prospect wants or needs, without having to tell you – makes you stand out and leads to more productive conversations.

2. Constantly Evolve Your Content

Our Pixoul team has tested about 6 different sales cadences and at least 50 different sales emails and call scripts since I started last October. Some were successful, most just flat out whiffed. However, we’ve learned how to showcase our strengths in a fashion that resonates with who we talk to on a daily basis. Not only does that help send more proposals, it creates a buying experience that helps maintain relationships (and renew contracts of course).

The moral of the story is – don’t be stubborn. I’ve written the supposed “perfect email” at least 10 times by now. (A) / (B) testing sequences can be a great way to get metrics in a shorter period of time.

3. Follow The Data

Lastly, understanding the data that comes from your outreach is paramount. Having accurate data points will help identify specific language that resonates. For calls, keep track of how many times you’ve connected, had a conversation, and set a follow up meeting with a prospect. Low connection to conversation rates mean the first thing you’re saying isn’t hitting with your prospect.

Same thing goes for email. Tracking your open, click (if you include links), and reply rates helps in finding the sweet spot for subject lines and email content. Low open rate? Try switching up the subject line. Low reply rate? Change up the call to action. Being cognizant of sequence metrics makes evolving content less of a shot in the dark.

Last quick hit – be patient. While teams need to be assertive and highly intentional about outreach numbers, finding what works takes time. The result of finalizing well thought out, data-backed campaigns leads to a much more efficient onboarding process once it’s time to scale again.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Wade McNamara

Wade is an emerging sales leader dedicated to building trust and long-lasting relationships with our clients. He's an avid Cleveland Browns fan and loving dog dad.

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